bharatbhasha.net
Free Articles  >>  Auto >>  Page 446  >> 

The Cooling System





The Cooling System
 by: Kevin Schappell

The purpose of the engine's cooling system is to remove excess heat from the engine, to keep the engine operating at its most efficient temperature, and to get the engine up to the correct temperature as soon as possible after starting. Ideally, the cooling system keeps the engine running at its most efficient temperature no matter what the operating conditions are.

As fuel is burned in the engine, about one-third of the energy in the fuel is converted into power. Another third goes out the exhaust pipe unused, and the remaining third becomes heat energy.

A cooling system of some kind is necessary in any internal combustion engine. If no cooling system were provided, parts would melt from the heat of the burning fuel, and the pistons would expand so much they could not move in the cylinders (called "seize").

The cooling system of a water-cooled engine consists of: the engine's water jacket, a thermostat, a water pump, a radiator and radiator cap, a cooling fan (electric or belt-driven), hoses, the heater core, and usually an expansion (overflow) tank.

Fuel burning engines produce enormous amounts of heat; temperatures can reach up to 4,000 degrees F when the air-fuel mixture burns. However, normal operating temperature is about 2,000 degrees F. The cooling system removes about one-third of the heat produced in the combustion chamber.

The exhaust system takes away much of the heat, but parts of the engine, such as the cylinder walls, pistons, and cylinder head, absorb large amounts of the heat. If a part of the engine gets too hot, the oil film fails to protect it. This lack of lubrication can ruin the engine.

On the other hand, if an engine runs at too low a temperature, it is inefficient, the oil gets dirty (adding wear and subtracting horsepower), deposits form, and fuel mileage is poor-- not to mention exhaust emissions! For these reasons, the cooling system is designed to stay out of the action until the engine is warmed up.

There are two types of cooling systems; liquid cooling and air cooling. Most auto engines are cooled by the liquid type; air cooling is used more frequently for airplanes, motorcycles and lawnmowers.

Liquid cooled engines have passages for the liquid, or coolant, through the cylinder block and head. The coolant has to have indirect contact with such engine parts as the combustion chamber, the cylinder walls, and the valve seats and guides. Running through the passages in the engine heats the coolant (it absorbs the heat from the engine parts), and going through the radiator cools it. After getting "cool" again in the radiator, the coolant comes back through the engine. This business continues as long as the engine is running, with the coolant absorbing and removing the engine's heat, and the radiator cooling the coolant.

A cooling system pressure tester is used to check the pressure in the cooling system, which allows the mechanic to determine if the system has any slow leaks. The leak can then be found and fixed before it causes a major problem.

The above information is directly from the Auto Insight program which you can buy online from <a href="http://AutoEducation.com" target=new>AutoEducation.com</a>.

Common Problems:

Let's look at the common problems cars have with the cooling system.


  • Broken hose. Hoses wear out and can leak. Once the coolant has left the system it can no longer cool the engine and it overheats.

  • Broken fan belt. The water pump is driven by the engine through a belt. If the belt breaks the water pump can not turn and coolant will not be circulated through the engine. This will also lead to engine overheating.

  • Faulty radiator cap. The radiator cap is designed to hold a certain pressure in the coolant system. Most caps hold 8 - 12 PSI. This pressure raises the point in which the coolant will boil and maintains a stable system. If your cap does not hold pressure, then the car could overheat on hot days since the system never becomes pressurized.

  • Water pump failure. Most commonly you will hear a screeching noise and will be able to see coolant leaking from the front of the pump or under the car. Early signs are small spots of coolant under the car after being parked overnight and a strong coolant odor while driving.

  • Head gasket... have large amounts of white smoke flowing out of your exhaust? Could be a head gasket. The head gasket seals the cylinder head to the engine block and also seals the coolant passages. When this gasket fails coolant can enter the cylinder and it will be turned to vapor as the engine fires. Head gaskets most often fail after the engine has experienced an overheating situation. When super hot, the cylinder head can warp and allow the gasket to fail.


Preventive Maintenance:


  • Check all belts and hoses regularly. (at oil change is a good time)

  • Look out for coolant leaks underneath the car, they could be signs of trouble to come.

  • Change your coolant every 2 - 3 years depending on the manufactorers recommendations.

  • Inspect your radiator cap for deterioration of the rubber seal. Replace if you think it is worn. $5 - $10 is cheap insurance.

  • Have your coolant system flushed every 5 years. It gets all the corrosion which has built up out of the system.


What to discuss with your mechanic:


  • Let your mechanic know when your overheating problems occur. Overheating when idling points to a different problem than overheating at highway speeds.

  • Ask your mechanic if it's worth changing the timing belt or chain while he is replacing your water pump. Many times the timing belt turns the water pump so it has to be removed anyway to access the water pump.


WARNING: Never open your radiator when the engine is hot. The pressure in the system can cause hot coolant to splash out and burn you.


About Author Kevin Schappell :



Kevin Schappell maintains http://www.carbuyersclub.com where he gives advice on buying, selling, insurance, and financing. A mechanical engineer and car guy, Kevin has decided to spend his online time helping others learn about automobiles. To learn more about how your car works, Kevin has created http://www.mycarwizard.com.

kevin@schappell.com


Article Source: http://www.bharatbhasha.net
Article Url: http://www.bharatbhasha.net/automobiles.php/14256

LD
Other Articles by Kevin Schappell

•A Cars HVAC System
   by Kevin SchappellNot only do we depend on our cars to get us where we want to go, we also depend on them to get us there without discomfort. We expect the heater to keep us warm when it's cold outside, and the air conditioning system to keep us cool when it's hot. We get heat from the heater core, sort of a secondary radiator, which is part of the car's cooling system. We get air conditioning from the car's elaborate air conditioning system. Despite its relatively small size, the cooling...

•The Exhaust System
 by: Kevin Schappell Your car's exhaust system carries away the gases created when the fuel and air are burned in the combustion chamber. These gases are harmful to humans and our environment. A frequent check of your exhaust system is a must to provide for you and your family's safety. Make sure there are no holes in the exhaust system or in the passenger compartment where exhaust fumes could enter. Let's begin by listing the parts of the exhaust system and their functions. Exhaust...

•Your Fuel System
 by: Kevin Schappell The fuel system feed your engine the gasoline/diesel it needs to run. If anyone of the parts in the system break down your engine will not run. Let's look at the major parts of the fuel system, Fuel tank: Basically a holding tank for your fuel. When you fill up at a gas station the gas travels down the filler tube and into the tank. In the tank there is a sending unit, which tells the gas gauge how much gas is in the tank. Fuel pump: On newer cars the fuel pump is...

•How Your Cars Suspension Works
 by: Kevin Schappell Suspension, when discussing cars, refers to the use of front and rear springs to suspend a vehicle's sprung weight. The springs used on today's cars and trucks are constructed in a variety of types, shapes, sizes, rates, and capacities. Types include leaf springs, coil springs, air springs, and torsion bars. These are used in sets of four for each vehicle, or they may be paired off in various combinations and are attached by several different mounting techniques. The...

•Finding The Perfect Car For You
 by: Kevin Schappell Your car may be the second largest purchase you make in your lifetime. You must take your time and not let it become an impulse decision. Before you go out browsing dealer lots consider the following: How will I use my new car, truck or sport utility vehicle? A mini-van will fit fine in a large family but might be out of place in a singles life. Do you go off-road a lot but still like to carry more than 2 passengers, go for the SUV. Trucks have come along way with most...

•Test Driving A New Car
 by: Kevin Schappell One of the most important steps in buying a new or used car is the test drive. You can do all the research you like, but it all comes down to the test drive. Driving the car must be comfortable, easy, and enjoyable. Follow these few steps and get the most out of your next test drive. Check over the car before you leave the dealer's lot. Tires, fluids, and lights should all be checked before you drive. Also make sure there is gas in the car. If at all possible go...

•Winter Car Care
 by: Kevin Schappell As the weather turns colder, it is time to think about your car for a second. A little preparation can go a long way to making your winter travels a lot safer. Here is a checklist to get you started. 1. Check the antifreeze. The freezing point can be checked with a simple tool available at any auto parts store. Make sure you check the antifreeze when it's cool. Opening a hot radiator can be a dangerous thing. 2. Check the air pressure in your tires. As the air gets...

•Checking Fluids
 by: Kevin Schappell Keeping your vehicle in tip-top shape requires constant monitoring of vital fluids. Read you owners manual and look for a diagram of the engine. Most times there will be a diagram showing where to check all the major fluids. This should be your starting point. If your manual is lost in the glove box or you never had one, then ask your mechanic or a friend who knows cars to show you all the places to check. There are 4 major levels to check on most cars. Engine...

•The Engine Explained
 by: Kevin Schappell The engine is the heart of your car, but instead of pumping blood, the engine pumps air and fuel. The engines main function is to convert air and fuel into rotary motion so it can drive the wheels of the car. How does it do that ??.... Well let's start with a cutaway of the engine and see all the major parts then we will get into the actual mechanics. Pistons: Most common engines have 4, 6, or 8 pistons, which move up and down in the cylinders. On the upper side of...

Publishers / Webmasters
Tell A Friend
Leave A Comment!
Download this article in PDF
Report Article!
Search through all the articles:


112 Users Online !
Related Articles:
Latest Articles:
 
Auto >> Top 50 Articles on Auto
Category - >
• Advertising • Advice • Affiliate Programs • Automobiles
• Be Your Own Mentor • Careers • Communication • Consumers
• CopyWriting • Crime • Domain Names • DoT com Entrepreneur Corner
• Ebooks • Ecommerce • Education • Email
• Entertainment • Environment • Family • Finance And Business
• Food & Drink • Gardening • Health & Fitness • Hobbies
• Home Business • Home Improvement • Humour • House Holds
• Internet And Computers • Kiddos and Teens • Legal Matters • Mail Order
• Management • Marketing • Marriage • MetaPhysical
• Motivational • MultiMedia • Multi Level Marketing • NewsLetters
• Pets • Psychology • Religion • Parenting
• Politics • Sales • Science • Search Engine Optimization
• Site Promotion • Sports • Technology • Travel
• Web Development • Web Hosting • WeightLoss • Women's Corner
• Writing • Miscellaneous Articles • Real Estate • Arts And Crafts
• Aging


Disclaimer: The information presented and opinions expressed in the articles are those of the authors
and do not necessarily represent the views of bharatbhasha.net and/or its owners.


Copyright © AwareINDIA. All rights reserved || Privacy Policy || Terms Of Use || Author Guidelines || Free Articles
FAQs Link To Us || Submit An Article || Free Downloads|| Contact Us || Site Map  || Advertise with Us ||
Click here for Special webhosting packages for visitors of this website only!
Vastu Shastra

Linux Hosting Provided By AwareIndia